02 March 2017

Dependencies

The following dependencies have been upgraded

  • org.slf4j:slf4j-simple:1.7.24

  • org.slf4j:slf4j-log4j:1.7.24

  • org.jetbrains.kotlin:kotlin-stdlib:1.1.0

  • org.testfx:testfx-core:4.0.5-alpha

  • org.codehaus.groovy:groovy-all:2.4.9

Runtime

Module Evictions

The current module system allows multiple modules to supply type bindings. Given binding equivalences a module may override bindings supplied by other modules, but you can’t avoid the original bindings from being added in the first case. Now it’s possible for a module to evict another one, effectively barring the evicted module from contributing its bindings. Let’s say there’s a module named "foo" defined as follows

import griffon.core.injection.Module;
import griffon.inject.DependsOn;
import org.codehaus.griffon.runtime.core.injection.AbstractModule;
import org.kordamp.jipsy.ServiceProviderFor;

import javax.inject.Named;

@Named("foo")
@ServiceProviderFor(Module.class)
public class FooModule extends AbstractModule {
    @Override
    protected void doConfigure() {
        // binding definitions
    }
}

You may evict this module by defining another module annotated with @Evicts, such as

import griffon.core.injection.Module;
import griffon.inject.DependsOn;
import griffon.inject.Evicts;
import org.codehaus.griffon.runtime.core.injection.AbstractModule;
import org.kordamp.jipsy.ServiceProviderFor;

import javax.inject.Named;

@Named("foo")
@Evicts("foo")
@ServiceProviderFor(Module.class)
public class FooEvictorModule extends AbstractModule {
    @Override
    protected void doConfigure() {
        // binding definitions
    }
}

The evicting module (FooEvictorModule) has to have the same name as the evicted module (FooModule) hence why both modules are annotated with @Named("foo").

Enhanced Properties and ResourceBundle Support

It’s now possible to define conditional blocks in properties files and class based resource bundles, similarly as it’s done in Groovy scripts. For example the datasource plugin lets you define datasource configuration that may be environment sensible. In the Groovy version of the configuration you’d write the following

DataSource.groovy
dataSource.driverClassName = 'org.h2.Driver'
environments {
    development {
        dataSource.url = 'jdbc:h2:mem:@application.name@-dev'
    }
    test {
        dataSource.url = 'jdbc:h2:mem:@application.name@-test'
    }
    production {
        dataSource.url = 'jdbc:h2:file:/opt/@application.name@/data/db'
    }
}

You can rewrite this configuration file using just properties files in the this way

DataSource.properties
dataSource.driverClassName = org.h2.Driver
environments.development.dataSource.url = jdbc:h2:mem:@application.name@-dev
environments.test.dataSource.url = jdbc:h2:mem:@application.name@-test
environments.production.dataSource.url = jdbc:h2:file:/opt/@application.name@/data/db

Here’s the class based ResourceBundle approach

DataSource.java
import java.util.Map;

import griffon.util.AbstractMapResourceBundle;

import static griffon.util.CollectionUtils.map;

public class DataSource extends AbstractMapResourceBundle {
    @Override
    protected void initialize(Map<String, Object> entries) {
        map(entries)
            .e("dataSource", map()
                .e("driverClassName", "org.h2.Driver")
            )
            .e("environments", map()
                .e("development", map()
                    .e("dataSource", map()
                        .e("url", "jdbc:h2:mem:sample-dev")
                    )
                )
                .e("test", map()
                    .e("dataSource", map()
                        .e("url", "jdbc:h2:mem:sample-test")
                    )
                )
                .e("production", map()
                    .e("dataSource", map()
                        .e("url", "jdbc:h2:file:/opt/:sample/data/db")
                    )
                )
            );
    }
}

JavaFX Support

All of the binding and property support classes added in 2.9.0 have been relocated form package griffon.javafx.support to griffon.javafx.beans.binding and griffon.javafx.beans.property in order to mirror the same package structure found in the standard JavaFX APIs. All collection classes have been moved from package griffon.javafx.support to griffon.javafx.collections for the same reason.

ElementObservableList

New ElementObservableList can listen to updates on elements and trigger an update within itself. This enables widgets such as ListView and TableView to redraw data as soon as an element update is posted. Here’s a concrete example, say you have an observable bean defined as follows:

public class ObservablePerson implements ElementObservableList.PropertyContainer {
    private final IntegerProperty id = new SimpleIntegerProperty(this, "id");
    private final StringProperty name = new SimpleStringProperty(this, "name");
    private final StringProperty lastname = new SimpleStringProperty(this, "lastname");

    public ObservablePerson(int id, String name, String lastname) {
        setId(id);
        setName(name);
        setLastname(lastname);
    }

    public IntegerProperty idProperty() {
        return id;
    }

    public StringProperty nameProperty() {
        return name;
    }

    public StringProperty lastnameProperty() {
        return lastname;
    }

    // getters & setters

    @Override
    public Property<?>[] properties() {
        return new Property<?>[]{
            idProperty(),
            nameProperty(),
            lastnameProperty()
        };
    }
}

Notice that the bean class must implement ElementObservableList.PropertyContainer, which defines a single method that helps ElementObservableList figure out what properties should be used to determine a change within the bean. Setting up a ListView backed by an ElementObservableList is as easy as

listView.setItems(new ElementObservableList<>());

Now, whenever an element of type ObservablePerson is added and any of its properties is modified then the ListView will react too.

Resetable Properties

There’s a new set of JavaFX properties that can be used to keep track of value changes, and when necessary reset the property’s value to a base one.

Action Matching Strategy

Griffon 2 defines a naming convention to match widgets defined in FXML with their corresponding action. Griffon 2.8.0 introduced another way to match actions that enables multiple widgets to be matched to the same action. Griffon 2.10.0 adds the possibility to override this startegy and apply your own. Simply define an implementation of griffon.javafx.support.ActionMatcher and bound it to the application (or addon) module. Here’s an example of a custom strategy that uses "_action" as suffix instead of the conventional "ActionTarget".

import griffon.javafx.support.ActionMatcher;
import griffon.javafx.support.JavaFXAction;
import javafx.scene.Node;
import javafx.scene.control.MenuItem;

import javax.annotation.Nonnull;
import java.util.Collection;

import static griffon.javafx.support.JavaFXUtils.configureControl;
import static griffon.javafx.support.JavaFXUtils.findElement;
import static griffon.javafx.support.JavaFXUtils.findElements;
import static griffon.javafx.support.JavaFXUtils.getGriffonActionId;

public class MyActionMatcher implements ActionMatcher {
    @Override
    public void match(final @Nonnull Object node, final @Nonnull String actionName, @Nonnull JavaFXAction action) {
        Collection<Object> controls = findElements(node, arg -> {
            if (arg instanceof Node) {
                return actionName.equals(getGriffonActionId((Node) arg));
            } else if (arg instanceof MenuItem) {
                return actionName.equals(getGriffonActionId((MenuItem) arg));
            }
            return false;
        });

        for (Object control : controls) {
            configureControl(control, action);
        }

        Object control = findElement(node, actionName + "_action");
        if (control != null && !controls.contains(control)) {
            configureControl(control, action);
        }
    }
}

Buildtime

Gradle Griffon Plugin

There are two new properties found in this plugin:

  • generateProjectStructure: whether to create the standard project layout (griffon-app directory and subdirectories) or not. Default value is set to true.

  • applicationProject: automatically includes the application plugin and other features for building an application distribution. Default value is set to true. Turn it off in projects that require Griffon support but do not define or require an application luancher.

Compatibility

Full binary compatibility report between Griffon 2.10.0 and 2.9.1 can be found here.

A list of fixed issues can be found at the 2.10.0 milestone page.